Pain Improvement After Healing Touch and Massage in Breast Cancer: an Observational Retrospective Study

  • Danielle Gentile, PhD Levine Cancer Institute
  • Danielle Boselli, MS Levine Cancer Institute
  • Susan Yaguda, MSN,RN Levine Cancer Institute, Atrium Health
  • Rebecca Greiner, PhD, PA-C Levine Cancer Institute
  • Chasse Bailey-Dorton, MD, MSPH Levine Cancer Institute
Keywords: breast cancer, cancer pain, healing touch, oncology massage, nonpharmacologic pain management

Abstract

   Background: Healing Touch (HT) and Oncology Massage (OM) are nonpharmacologic pain interventions, yet a comparative effectiveness study has not been conducted for pain in breast cancer. Purpose: This breast cancer subgroup analysis compared the effectiveness of HT vs. OM on pain. Setting: The research occurred at an outpatient setting at an academic hybrid, multi-site, community-based cancer institute and Department of Supportive Oncology across four regional locations. Participants: Breast cancer outpatients along the cancer continuum who experienced routine clinical, nonexperimentally manipulated HT or OM. Research Design: The study was an observational, retrospective, comparative effectiveness post hoc subanalysis of a larger dataset. Patients reporting pain < 2 were excluded. Pre- and posttherapy pain scores and differences were calculated. Logistic regression modeled posttherapy pain by modality, adjusting for pretherapy pain. The proportions experiencing ? 2-point (clinically significant) pain reduction were compared with chi-square tests. Intervention: The study focused on the first session of either HT or OM. Main Outcome Measures: Pre- and posttherapy pain (range: 0 = no pain to 10 = worst possible pain). Results: A total of 407 patients reported pre- and posttherapy pain scores, comprised of 233 (57.3%) who received HT and 174 (42.8%) who received OM. Pretherapy mean pain was higher in HT (M=5.1, ± 2.3) than OM (M=4.3, ± 2.1) (p < .001); posttherapy mean pain remained higher in HT (M=2.7, ± 2.2) than OM (M=1.9, ± 1.7) (p < .001). Mean difference in pain reduction was 2.4 for both HT and OM. Both HT (p < .001) and OM (p < .001) were associated

Author Biographies

Danielle Gentile, PhD, Levine Cancer Institute

Department of Supportive Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Atrium Health

Danielle Boselli, MS, Levine Cancer Institute

Department of Cancer Biostatistics, Atrium Health

Susan Yaguda, MSN,RN, Levine Cancer Institute, Atrium Health

Department of Supportive Oncology

Rebecca Greiner, PhD, PA-C, Levine Cancer Institute

Department of Supportive Oncology, Atrium Health

Chasse Bailey-Dorton, MD, MSPH, Levine Cancer Institute

Department of Supportive Oncology, Atrium Health

Published
2020-12-08
How to Cite
Gentile, PhD, D., Boselli, MS, D., Yaguda, MSN,RN, S., Greiner, PhD, PA-C, R., & Bailey-Dorton, MD, MSPH, C. (2020). Pain Improvement After Healing Touch and Massage in Breast Cancer: an Observational Retrospective Study. International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork: Research, Education, & Practice, 14(1), 12-20. https://doi.org/10.3822/ijtmb.v14i1.549
Section
Research